Space Takers: Kitchen Edition

  • By birdie@getorganizedcolumbus.com
  • 11 Nov, 2016
Kitchen
Home after home, we tend to see the same type of products consumed that quickly become part of the one-hit wonder pile. There are so many sleek products out there which promise to make tasks easier–and perhaps they do. But our crowded cabinet space can become easily overwhelmed by these limited-use items. Many purchases are banned to the […] 
Home after home, we tend to see the same type of products consumed that quickly become part of the one-hit wonder pile. There are so many sleek products out there which promise to make tasks easier–and perhaps they do. But our crowded cabinet space can become easily overwhelmed by these limited-use items. Many purchases are banned to the basement and hardly heard of again–until the next time we decide to make our own gelato and homemade beef jerky.
Here are some of the key offenders for stealing prime kitchen space. And to be clear, this is a list to help us recognize what we actually use in relation to how much space is being taken. It is not a comment on value, quality, or utility. How many of these do you recognize?
Ice Cream Makers. Most clients say that either the result was not desireable and the effort wasn’t worth it. Again, I have to point out the occassional use status makes it a space stealer in the kitchen.
NutriBullet style blenders. This item has numerous parts that need stored and are difficult to keep together.
Waffle Iron.  We all love them, we just don’t love the space it takes to make them twice a year.
Bread Makers.  All of the above.
Specialty kitchen products such as Pampered Chef. I hate to call out a product that is quality made, but I am surprised by how often these items end up in the Donation pile. Items such as the whipped cream maker, the burger prep set, corn butterer and herb freezing tray–you catch my drift. These products are often clever, but they are also bulky, single-task products whose results can be achieved without the product.
Extra large grill tools–with a case. They are too long to store. Anywhere.
Digital meat thermometers. They take up a lot of drawer space for limited use.
Specialty slicers such as the banana slicer or avocado peeler and veggie wedger. These take up a lot of drawer space and can be easily managed with a typical paring knife.
Corn-on-the-Cob plates.
Oversized wine bottle openers. When a small cork screw with a leverage pull is all that is needed to do the job, I have to admit I don’t understand the appeal of these devices. Most drawers aren’t deep enough to open without knocking into the tool.
For the following items, you can save space by keeping only one:
  • cheese grater
  • cheese cutter
  • carrot peeler
  • garlic press
  • juice press
  • apple core cutter
  • pizza wheel
  • baster/injector
  • ice cream scoop
  • bottle and wine opener
And you can almost always find cabinet space by removing mismatched mugs, novelty wine glasses, plastic cups, and water bottles. You can also reduce mismatched plastic ware, carry-out packaging and saved shopping bags. These tend to proliferate over time and can be edited quickly to reduce clutter.
Before the holidays get bustling, we encourage you to take a look in your cabinets and release items that take more space than they deserve.

Get Organized Columbus

By Tera Harmon 16 Jan, 2018
Ever have that feeling after your home has been cleaned that things still don't seem put away and tidy? Or maybe you get that nagging sense when you walk into a room that things still need a "once over." Even in frequently-cleaned homes, we can feel like there is more to do when our clutter is the first thing that catches our eye in each room. Well the clutter itself may not be the only culprit. Our house habits can help highlight the things we use in a way that is not flattering.  Can you recognize any of these hotspots in your home?
By Tera Harmon 08 Jan, 2018
Photo Credit: Jay Wennington
By Birdie Brennan 04 Dec, 2017
Photo Credit: Kari Shea
By Tera Harmon 27 Nov, 2017
I always look forward to this cooler time of year to review coats and to decide where best to donate them. So many times when we hear about making a donation, we feel pressure to give financially. But giving something once owned and loved can be a fulfilling part of holiday tradition. I especially love involving kids so they can learn the idea of thinking of others at this time of year. Showing our kids how to prepare an item for donation teaches them how to care for others, but it also shows them to consider how their belongings can be useful beyond their own toy box. The act of cleaning up a gently used truck or putting new batteries into a remote control car to donate demonstrates to kids that our items are valuable to others--and that condition matters. This donation ritual is also an important purge ritual before the influx of contents that are about to enter our homes. 
By Tera Harmon 16 Nov, 2017

For even the most novice cooks, between now and the end of the year, many kitchens are about to get a workout. We may be hosting parties, holiday meals, trying a new recipe or two, participating in pot lucks, or baking with friends and family. Would't it be great if everything we need is at our fingertips--clean and functional for when we need it?


So often the tools and items we rely on at this time of year are somewhere in the back of cupboards, sideboards, or stored on basement shelving. I recommend gathering, cleaning, and staging the items you know will be needed in the coming weeks. In last week's post ( https://www.getorganizedcolumbus.com/the-ready-made-pantry ) we talked about a well-stocked pantry for the holiday season; for now, let's focus on the items we will likely need in the kitchen and dining areas.
More Posts

Get Organized Columbus

By Tera Harmon 16 Jan, 2018
Ever have that feeling after your home has been cleaned that things still don't seem put away and tidy? Or maybe you get that nagging sense when you walk into a room that things still need a "once over." Even in frequently-cleaned homes, we can feel like there is more to do when our clutter is the first thing that catches our eye in each room. Well the clutter itself may not be the only culprit. Our house habits can help highlight the things we use in a way that is not flattering.  Can you recognize any of these hotspots in your home?
By Tera Harmon 08 Jan, 2018
Photo Credit: Jay Wennington
By Birdie Brennan 04 Dec, 2017
Photo Credit: Kari Shea
By Tera Harmon 27 Nov, 2017
I always look forward to this cooler time of year to review coats and to decide where best to donate them. So many times when we hear about making a donation, we feel pressure to give financially. But giving something once owned and loved can be a fulfilling part of holiday tradition. I especially love involving kids so they can learn the idea of thinking of others at this time of year. Showing our kids how to prepare an item for donation teaches them how to care for others, but it also shows them to consider how their belongings can be useful beyond their own toy box. The act of cleaning up a gently used truck or putting new batteries into a remote control car to donate demonstrates to kids that our items are valuable to others--and that condition matters. This donation ritual is also an important purge ritual before the influx of contents that are about to enter our homes. 
More Posts
Share by: