Inadequate Storage–A Standard Home Feature?

  • By birdie@getorganizedcolumbus.com
  • 22 Mar, 2016
Home storage message
We hear a lot about overconsumption and having too many things to store in our homes. But an argument can be made that storage deficits are standard features in our homes that have persisted for decades. The demand for open floor plans may be one contributing factor, but so too is a lack of creative use […] 
We hear a lot about overconsumption and having too many things to store in our homes. But an argument can be made that storage deficits are standard features in our homes that have persisted for decades. The demand for open floor plans may be one contributing factor, but so too is a lack of creative use of space in places where there is proven to be a lot of activity and contents. These deficits are one of the main reasons why we search for products and furnishings to compensate. And the same storage issues exist for a four bedroom home that exist for a one bedroom apartment.
Here are the top areas lacking storage that suits our daily habits–do you recognize any of these?
In the entryway. We need to take off our shoes here. We need to remove our coats here. We have keys and bags to set down. There are umbrellas to carry and mail to drop off. Having a baron entryway with one coat closet for hanging coats is not sufficient. Yet this is the design that persists.
In the kitchen. The hollow space of our lower cabinets under the sink is a wasteland. It is shame that so much space is wasted when we need a place for cleaning supplies, dish soap, dishwasher soap, dish racks, floor cleaner, granite cleaner, silver cleaner, sponges, rubber gloves, scrub brushes, SOS pads, scrapers, and so on and so on—–none of which fits well here.
In the living room. Few living rooms have closets, shelves, or built ins. Yet this is where people read, watch movies, listen to music, keep photo albums and play board games, etc. Instead, we resort relying on t.v. cabinets and or put-together shelving that easily becomes overwhelmed.
In the bathroom. Bathrooms built with only one mirror vanity and one lower cabinet for storage are laughable. There is NO bathroom where this works. We need to store towels, soaps, cleaners, toilet paper, personal products, corded personal care items, brushes, medicines, just to name a few needs. The vanity and shelves behind the mirror simply aren’t going to cut it.
The garage. Most are just a concrete floor and remote-control door. Yet many people like to store tools here, auto supplies, yard applications, garbage and recycling receptacles. Shelving is most certainly a given in this space.
It seems to me it is time to rethink design from the perspective of common inventory, and what we refer to in the digital world as a better user-experience. The above behaviors are standard in most homes…so why not make solutions that are standard? We need more than bare walls and stock cabinetry and featureless closets. It is time to integrate good design with ample storage solutions, and make storage an integrated feature of the home rather than an upgrade or an amenity. Until then, we understand the frustration, and we strive to help you design more functional spaces.

Get Organized Columbus

By Tera Harmon 16 Jan, 2018
Ever have that feeling after your home has been cleaned that things still don't seem put away and tidy? Or maybe you get that nagging sense when you walk into a room that things still need a "once over." Even in frequently-cleaned homes, we can feel like there is more to do when our clutter is the first thing that catches our eye in each room. Well the clutter itself may not be the only culprit. Our house habits can help highlight the things we use in a way that is not flattering.  Can you recognize any of these hotspots in your home?
By Tera Harmon 08 Jan, 2018
Photo Credit: Jay Wennington
By Birdie Brennan 04 Dec, 2017
Photo Credit: Kari Shea
By Tera Harmon 27 Nov, 2017
I always look forward to this cooler time of year to review coats and to decide where best to donate them. So many times when we hear about making a donation, we feel pressure to give financially. But giving something once owned and loved can be a fulfilling part of holiday tradition. I especially love involving kids so they can learn the idea of thinking of others at this time of year. Showing our kids how to prepare an item for donation teaches them how to care for others, but it also shows them to consider how their belongings can be useful beyond their own toy box. The act of cleaning up a gently used truck or putting new batteries into a remote control car to donate demonstrates to kids that our items are valuable to others--and that condition matters. This donation ritual is also an important purge ritual before the influx of contents that are about to enter our homes. 
By Tera Harmon 16 Nov, 2017

For even the most novice cooks, between now and the end of the year, many kitchens are about to get a workout. We may be hosting parties, holiday meals, trying a new recipe or two, participating in pot lucks, or baking with friends and family. Would't it be great if everything we need is at our fingertips--clean and functional for when we need it?


So often the tools and items we rely on at this time of year are somewhere in the back of cupboards, sideboards, or stored on basement shelving. I recommend gathering, cleaning, and staging the items you know will be needed in the coming weeks. In last week's post ( https://www.getorganizedcolumbus.com/the-ready-made-pantry ) we talked about a well-stocked pantry for the holiday season; for now, let's focus on the items we will likely need in the kitchen and dining areas.
More Posts

Get Organized Columbus

By Tera Harmon 16 Jan, 2018
Ever have that feeling after your home has been cleaned that things still don't seem put away and tidy? Or maybe you get that nagging sense when you walk into a room that things still need a "once over." Even in frequently-cleaned homes, we can feel like there is more to do when our clutter is the first thing that catches our eye in each room. Well the clutter itself may not be the only culprit. Our house habits can help highlight the things we use in a way that is not flattering.  Can you recognize any of these hotspots in your home?
By Tera Harmon 08 Jan, 2018
Photo Credit: Jay Wennington
By Birdie Brennan 04 Dec, 2017
Photo Credit: Kari Shea
By Tera Harmon 27 Nov, 2017
I always look forward to this cooler time of year to review coats and to decide where best to donate them. So many times when we hear about making a donation, we feel pressure to give financially. But giving something once owned and loved can be a fulfilling part of holiday tradition. I especially love involving kids so they can learn the idea of thinking of others at this time of year. Showing our kids how to prepare an item for donation teaches them how to care for others, but it also shows them to consider how their belongings can be useful beyond their own toy box. The act of cleaning up a gently used truck or putting new batteries into a remote control car to donate demonstrates to kids that our items are valuable to others--and that condition matters. This donation ritual is also an important purge ritual before the influx of contents that are about to enter our homes. 
More Posts
Share by: