30-Minute Closet Cleanse

  • By birdie@getorganizedcolumbus.com
  • 13 Jan, 2016
Closet
Our closets often become a dumping ground for household items. It’s just so easy to pull the door closed and forget the stash. A quick cleanse can restore order to this overstressed space. Here are some of the top 10 things that can be quickly eliminated from the pile to jump start your closet cleanse: 1. […] 
Our closets often become a dumping ground for household items. It’s just so easy to pull the door closed and forget the stash. A quick cleanse can restore order to this overstressed space. Here are some of the top 10 things that can be quickly eliminated from the pile to jump start your closet cleanse:
1. Empty product boxes-  You know the ones…..they still have the Styrofoam inside for safe keeping. Meanwhile the product it once held will likely never make it back to the foam womb. And we have all been hijacked by the sleek, sturdy, and beautiful containers our Apple products are packaged in. Please, do yourself a favor. Release the boxes. Save your space.
2. Empty shoe boxes—that are literally empty! The resourceful side of our brain believes that we can use these again to hold “something.” If that something hasn’t made it in there–kick it to the recycle curb!
3. Grocery bagsand eco-bags. Plastic bags can have a second life; they are used to clean up after pets, line our trash bins, or wrapping wet exercise gear. Finding a second use is fine….but it doesn’t mean we need to hoard more than a dozen or so at a time. Curb the volume on these…and save some space.
4. Paperthat is past its prime. Bent printer paper, half-used notebooks and sticky notepads that no longer stick, wrapping paper and tissue that appears used. Consider condition and the impact it has on usefulness. Recycle what you can. You will accumulate more.
5. Old duffle bags and bookbags. We all have the duffle from that certain conference we attended or from the health fair giveaway. I think that people have a hard time parting with duffle bags because they “could be” useful. You might use a gym bag, you might travel and have use for a duffle. Pick your favorite, and let the rest be donated.
6. Briefcases and laptop bags. The same rule applies. The work-logo laptop bag that held our 14-pound work computer has likely ceased to be relevant or useful.
7. VHS tapesand other media that can no longer be viewed. Unless you have a true commitment to investing in restoration, these are doing you no good on a shelf.
8. Deteriorating photo albums. Your photos are not safe here! Pull out the photos, get rid of the rotting albums and magnetic pages.
9. Old board games.When is the last time you played Hungry Hippos as a family or located the game pieces that belong to an old favorite? Keep what is currently enjoyed and let the rest go.
10. Remove anything that might have a better home elsewhere such as sporting gear, dirty laundry, unseasonal shoes and outerwear.

Get Organized Columbus

By Tera Harmon 16 Jan, 2018
Ever have that feeling after your home has been cleaned that things still don't seem put away and tidy? Or maybe you get that nagging sense when you walk into a room that things still need a "once over." Even in frequently-cleaned homes, we can feel like there is more to do when our clutter is the first thing that catches our eye in each room. Well the clutter itself may not be the only culprit. Our house habits can help highlight the things we use in a way that is not flattering.  Can you recognize any of these hotspots in your home?
By Tera Harmon 08 Jan, 2018
Photo Credit: Jay Wennington
By Birdie Brennan 04 Dec, 2017
Photo Credit: Kari Shea
By Tera Harmon 27 Nov, 2017
I always look forward to this cooler time of year to review coats and to decide where best to donate them. So many times when we hear about making a donation, we feel pressure to give financially. But giving something once owned and loved can be a fulfilling part of holiday tradition. I especially love involving kids so they can learn the idea of thinking of others at this time of year. Showing our kids how to prepare an item for donation teaches them how to care for others, but it also shows them to consider how their belongings can be useful beyond their own toy box. The act of cleaning up a gently used truck or putting new batteries into a remote control car to donate demonstrates to kids that our items are valuable to others--and that condition matters. This donation ritual is also an important purge ritual before the influx of contents that are about to enter our homes. 
By Tera Harmon 16 Nov, 2017

For even the most novice cooks, between now and the end of the year, many kitchens are about to get a workout. We may be hosting parties, holiday meals, trying a new recipe or two, participating in pot lucks, or baking with friends and family. Would't it be great if everything we need is at our fingertips--clean and functional for when we need it?


So often the tools and items we rely on at this time of year are somewhere in the back of cupboards, sideboards, or stored on basement shelving. I recommend gathering, cleaning, and staging the items you know will be needed in the coming weeks. In last week's post ( https://www.getorganizedcolumbus.com/the-ready-made-pantry ) we talked about a well-stocked pantry for the holiday season; for now, let's focus on the items we will likely need in the kitchen and dining areas.
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Get Organized Columbus

By Tera Harmon 16 Jan, 2018
Ever have that feeling after your home has been cleaned that things still don't seem put away and tidy? Or maybe you get that nagging sense when you walk into a room that things still need a "once over." Even in frequently-cleaned homes, we can feel like there is more to do when our clutter is the first thing that catches our eye in each room. Well the clutter itself may not be the only culprit. Our house habits can help highlight the things we use in a way that is not flattering.  Can you recognize any of these hotspots in your home?
By Tera Harmon 08 Jan, 2018
Photo Credit: Jay Wennington
By Birdie Brennan 04 Dec, 2017
Photo Credit: Kari Shea
By Tera Harmon 27 Nov, 2017
I always look forward to this cooler time of year to review coats and to decide where best to donate them. So many times when we hear about making a donation, we feel pressure to give financially. But giving something once owned and loved can be a fulfilling part of holiday tradition. I especially love involving kids so they can learn the idea of thinking of others at this time of year. Showing our kids how to prepare an item for donation teaches them how to care for others, but it also shows them to consider how their belongings can be useful beyond their own toy box. The act of cleaning up a gently used truck or putting new batteries into a remote control car to donate demonstrates to kids that our items are valuable to others--and that condition matters. This donation ritual is also an important purge ritual before the influx of contents that are about to enter our homes. 
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